Tuesday, 23 October 2012

No change in Pak's tour to SA

South Africa reject Pakistan's request for schedule change

Umar Farooq and Firdose Moonda
October 23, 2012
Comments: 14 | Post yours as Owais Ashraf | Text size: A | A

Misbah-ul-Haq shakes Graeme Smith's hand, Pakistan v South Africa, 2nd Test, Abu Dhabi, 1st day, November 20, 2010
The three Tests, five ODIs and two T20s will go on as planned © AFP


Cricket South Africa (CSA) has turned down the Pakistan Cricket Board's (PCB) request to alter the dates of Pakistan's tour to South Africa starting February 2013 citing busy international schedule as the reason. The PCB had requested the change to expand the current 12-day window for its proposed Twenty20 league that follows the South Africa tour in March.
"We wanted to expand our window (for the T20 league), but they (CSA) didn't agree so we decided to continue as per the Future Tours Programme," Zaka Ashraf, the PCB chairman, told ESPNcricinfo. "CSA told the PCB that they had already announced and sold tickets and it was not possible to make any change."
Pakistan are set to launch their T20 premier league in March and were hoping to have a bigger window while avoiding a clash with the 2013 season of IPL that starts from April 3. They are scheduled  to play three Tests, five ODIs and two T20s between February 1 and March 24, 2013 and wanted the dates to be advanced. However, South Africa will be busy hosting New Zealand in December and January.
"They (PCB) asked us to move the tour earlier but it was just not possible because of our schedule," Jacques Faul, the acting CSA chief executive, told ESPNcricinfo. "We always try to accommodate other countries but we can't always manage. The program is very busy these days. We also play our domestic competitions while tours are ongoing."
Meanwhile, the PCB is expediting the staging of the inaugural T20 premier league. One of the purposes of the league is to take steps towards the revival of international cricket in Pakistan by inviting overseas players to participate. The confidence has increased after the success of the matches played between International XI and Pakistan All Star XI in Karachi recently that saw international players for the first time in Pakistan since the attack on the Sri Lankan team bus in March 2009.

Wednesday, 4 January 2012

PAKISTANI CRICKTERS

Zaheer Abbas

Zaheer Abbas
ظہیر عباس
Personal information
Full name Syed Zaheer Abbas Kirmani
Born 24 July 1947 (1947-07-24) (age 64)
SIALKOT, PUNJAB, PAKISTAN
Batting style Right-handed batsman
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Test debut (cap 63) October 24 1969 v NEW ZEALAND
ODI debut (cap 13) August 31 1974 v ENGLAND
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI fc
Matches 78 62 459
Runs scored 5062 2572 34843
batting averege 44.79 47.62 51.54
100s/50s 12/20 7/13 108/158
Top score 274 123 274
Balls bowled 370 280 2582
Wickets 3 7 30
bowling averege 44.00 31.85 38.20
5 wickets in innings - - 1
10 wickets in match - - -
Best bowling 2/21 2/26 5/15
Catches/stumping 34/- 16/- 278/-

Syed Zaheer Abbas Kirmani (urdu: سید ظہیر عباس کرمانی) (born 24 July 1947, sialkot), popularly known as Zaheer Abbas, is a former pakistani crickter, regarded as one of the finest batsmen produced by that country. He is widely known as the "Asian Bradman"a reference to former Australian great sir donald . He is among few professional cricketers who used to wear specticles

Wednesday, 28 December 2011

FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN CRICKTERS

 

Mark Waugh

Mark Waugh
Personal information
Full name Mark Edward Waugh AM
Born 2 June 1965 (age 46)
Canterbury, New South Wales, Australia
Nickname Junior
Batting style Right-hand
Bowling style Right-arm medium/off-break
Role Batsman
Relations SR Waugh, DP Waugh (brothers)
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 349) 25 January 1991 v England
Last Test 19 October 2002 v Pakistan
ODI debut (cap 105) 11 December 1988 v Pakistan
Last ODI 3 February 2002 v South Africa
ODI shirt no. 6
Domestic team information
Years Team
1985–2004 New South Wales
1988–2002 Essex
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC List A
Matches 128 244 368 435
Runs scored 8029 8500 26855 14663
Batting average 41.81 39.35 52.04 39.10
100s/50s 20/47 18/50 81/133 27/85
Top score 153* 173 229* 173
Balls bowled 4853 3687 15808 6947
Wickets 59 85 208 173
Bowling average 41.16 34.56 40.98 33.42
5 wickets in innings 1 1 3 1
10 wickets in match 0 n/a 0 n/a
Best bowling 5/40 5/24 6/68 5/24
Catches/stumpings 181/– 108/– 452/– 201/–
Source: cricketarchive.com, 19 August 2007
Mark Edward Waugh AM (born 2 June 1965) is a former Australian cricketer, who represented Australia in Test matches from early 1991 to late 2002, and made his One-Day International debut in 1988. Waugh is regarded as one of the most elegant and gifted stroke makers to ever play the game. His nickname is "Junior" as he is younger than his twin brother Steve by a few minutes. Dean Waugh, another of Mark's brothers, is also a cricketer, having played first-class and list A cricket in Australia.

Contents

Glenn McGrath

Glenn McGrath 01 crop 2.jpg
Fr
Glenn McGrath
Personal information
Full name Glenn Donald McGrath
Born 9 February 1970 (age 41)
Dubbo, New South Wales, Australia
Nickname Pigeon, Millard, Kuly, Ooh Ah
Height 1.94 m (6 ft 4 in)
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right arm Fast-Medium
Role Bowler
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 358) 12 November 1993 v New Zealand
Last Test 2 January 2007 v England
ODI debut (cap 113) 9 December 1993 v South Africa
Last ODI 28 April 2007 v sri lanka
ODI shirt no. 11
Domestic team information
Years Team
1992–2008 New South Wales (squad no. 11)
2000 Worcestershire
2004 Middlesex
2008– Delhi Daredevils
Career statistics
Competition Test ODIs FC LA
Matches 124 250 189 305
Runs scored 641 115 977 124
Batting average 7.36 3.83 7.75 3.35
100s/50s 0/1 0/0 0/2 0/0
Top score 61 11 61 11
Balls bowled 29248 12970 41759 15808
Wickets 563 381 835 463
Bowling average 21.64 22.02 20.85 21.60
5 wickets in innings 29 7 42 7
10 wickets in match 3 n/a 7 n/a
Best bowling 8/24 7/15 8/24 7/15
Catches/stumpings 38/– 37/– 54/– 48/–
Source: cricketarchive.com, 20 August 2007
Glenn Donald McGrath AM (pronounced /məˈɡrɑː/; born 9 February 1970 in Dubbo, New South Wales), nicknamed "Pigeon"[1], is a former Australian cricket player. He is one of the most highly regarded fast-medium pace bowlers in cricketing history,[2] and a leading contributor to Australia's domination of world cricket from the mid-1990s to the early 21st century.[3] He holds the world record for the highest number of Test wickets by a fast bowler and is fourth on the all-time list, with the top three wicket takers Muttiah Muralitharan, Shane Warne and Anil Kumble all being spin bowlers.[4] McGrath announced his retirement from Test cricket on 23 December 2006.[5] His Test career came to an end after the 5th Ashes test in Sydney, whilst the 2007 World Cup marked the end of his one-day career.[6] Known throughout his career for maintaining a remarkably accurate line and length, McGrath's consistency enabled him to be one of the most economical fast bowlers of his time. McGrath also played for the Indian Premier League team of Delhi DareDevils and was one of the tournaments most economical bowlers during its first season.[7] On January 5, the franchise announced that it had bought out the remaining year of his contract.[8]

Contents


Steve Waugh

Steve Waugh
SRWaugh.png
Personal information
Full name Stephen Rodger Waugh
Born 2 June 1965 (age 46)
Canterbury, New South Wales, Australia
Nickname Tugga, Iceman, Man-O'War
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Role Batsman
Relations DP Waugh, ME Waugh (brothers)
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 335) 26 December 1985 v India
Last Test 2 January 2004 v India
ODI debut (cap 90) 9 January 1986 v New Zealand
Last ODI 3 February 2002 v South Africa
ODI shirt no. 5
Domestic team information
Years Team
1984/85–2003/04 New South Wales
2002 Kent
1998 Ireland
1987–1988 Somerset
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC List A
Matches 168 325 356 436
Runs scored 10,927 7,569 24,052 11,764
Batting average 51.06 32.90 51.94 37.70
100s/50s 32/50 3/45 79/97 13/67
Top score 200 120* 216* 140*
Balls bowled 7,805 8,883 17,428 11,245
Wickets 92 195 249 257
Bowling average 37.44 34.67 32.75 33.49
5 wickets in innings 3 0 5 0
10 wickets in match 0 n/a 0 n/a
Best bowling 5/28 4/33 6/51 4/32
Catches/stumpings 112/– 111/– 273/– 150/–
Source: Cricinfo, 31 December 2004
Stephen Rodger "Steve" Waugh, AO (born 2 June 1965) is a former Australian cricketer and fraternal twin of cricketer Mark Waugh. A right-handed batsman, he was also a successful medium-pace bowler. Born in New South Wales, with whom he began his first class cricket career in 1984, he captained the Australian Test cricket team from 1999 to 2004, and was the most capped Test cricket player in history, with 168 appearances, until Sachin Tendulkar of India broke this record in 2010. Though thought of in the early stages of his career as only "a moderately talented player", at one point losing his Test place to his brother Mark, Waugh went on to become one of the leading batsmen of his time.[1] He is one of only eight players to have scored over 10,000 Test runs, led Australia to fifteen of their record sixteen consecutive Test wins, and to victory in the 1999 Cricket World Cup. He was named Australian of the Year in 2004[2][3] for his philanthropic work, and inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame in front of his home fans at the Sydney Cricket Ground in January 2010.[4]
A popular figure in the eyes of the public, Waugh has been included in a list of one hundred Australian Living Treasures by the National Trust of Australia, awarded the Order of Australia and the Australian Sports Medal. Known as an attacking and sometimes ruthlessly efficient captain,[5] Waugh rebuffed criticism over "manipulation of the points system" during the Cricket World Cup to ensure his team's progression, and was often critical of the media.[5] Described in 2003 as a "cold-blooded, scientific" leader, cricket columnist of The Times Simon Barnes noted that "Waugh wants to defeat you personally."[6] At the end of his final Test match, Waugh was carried by his team mates in a lap of honour around the Sydney Cricket Ground.[7]

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Shane Warne

Shane Warne
Shane Warne.jpg
Personal information
Full name Shane Keith Warne
Born 13 September 1969 (age 42)
Upper Ferntree Gully, Victoria, Australia
Nickname Warnie, King of Spin, Sheik of Tweak
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right-arm leg break
Role Leg spin bowler, Lower order batsman
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 350) 2 January 1992 v India
Last Test 2 January 2007 v England
ODI debut (cap 110) 24 March 1993 v New Zealand
Last ODI 10 January 2005 World XI v Asia XI
ODI shirt no. 23
Domestic team information
Years Team
1990/91–2006/07 Victoria (squad no. 23)
2000–2007 Hampshire (squad no. 23)
2008–2011 Rajasthan Royals (squad no. 23)
Career statistics
Competition Tests ODIs FC LA
Matches 145 194 301 311
Runs scored 3,154 1,018 6,919 1,879
Batting average 17.32 13.05 19.43 11.81
100s/50s 0/12 0/1 2/26 0/1
Top score 99 55 107* 55
Balls bowled 40,704 10,642 74,830 16,419
Wickets 708 293 1,319 473
Bowling average 25.41 25.73 26.11 24.61
5 wickets in innings 37 1 69 3
10 wickets in match 10 n/a 12 n/a
Best bowling 8/71 5/33 8/71 6/42
Catches/stumpings 125/– 80/– 264/– 126/–
Source: cricketarchive.com, 29 March 2008
Shane Keith Warne (born 13 September 1969) is a former Australian international cricketer widely regarded as one of the greatest bowlers in the history of the game.[1] In 2000, he was selected by a panel of cricket experts as one of the five Wisden Cricketers of the Century, the only specialist bowler selected in the quintet and the only one still playing at the time. He is also a cricket commentator and a professional poker player.
Warne played his first Test match in 1992, and his 708 wickets was the record for the most wickets taken by any bowler in Test cricket, until it was broken by Sri Lanka's Muttiah Muralitharan on 3 December 2007. He took over 1000 international wickets (in Tests and One-Day Internationals)—he was the second bowler to reach this milestone after Muttiah Muralitharan.[2] A useful lower-order batsman, Warne also scored over 3000 Test runs, and he holds the record for most Test runs without a century. His career was plagued by scandals off the field; these included a ban from cricket for testing positive for a prohibited substance, charges of bringing the game into disrepute through accepting money from bookmakers and marital infidelities.
As well as Australia, he also played Australian domestic cricket for his home state of Victoria, and English domestic cricket for Hampshire. He was captain of Hampshire for three seasons, from 2005 to 2007.
He retired from international cricket in January 2007, at the end of Australia's 5–0 Ashes series victory over England. Three other players integral to the Australian team at the time, Glenn McGrath, Damien Martyn and Justin Langer, also retired from Tests at the same time which led some, including the Australian captain, Ricky Ponting, to declare it the "end of an era".[3]
Following his retirement from international cricket, Warne played a full season at Hampshire in 2007. He had been scheduled to appear in the 2008 English cricket season, but in late March 2008 he announced his retirement from playing first-class cricket in order to be able to spend more time pursuing interests outside of cricket.[4] In March 2008, Warne signed to play in the Indian Premier League for the Jaipur team, Rajasthan Royals in the first edition of the tournament, where he played the roles of both captain and coach. He led his team to victory against the Chennai Super Kings in a cliffhanger of a final match on 1 June 2008.

Contents

 [hide

Cameron White

Cameron White
Personal information
Full name Cameron Leon White
Born 18 August 1983 (age 28)
Bairnsdale, Victoria, Australia
Nickname Whitey, Bear, Bundy
Height 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in)
Batting style Right-hand
Bowling style Legbreak googly
Role Batsman
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 402) 9 October 2008 v India
Last Test 10 November 2008 v India
ODI debut (cap 152) 5 October 2005 v ICC World XI
Last ODI 9 April 2011 v Bangladesh
ODI shirt no. 7
T20I debut (cap 22) 9 January 2007 v England
Last T20I 16 October 2011 v South Africa
Domestic team information
Years Team
1999–present Victoria (squad no. 9)
2007–2010 Royal Challengers Bangalore (squad no. 18)
2006–2007 Somerset
2011–present Deccan Chargers (squad no. 7)
2011–present Melbourne Stars
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC List A
Matches 4 87 116 205
Runs scored 146 2,037 7,038 5,201
Batting average 29.20 35.12 41.64 34.67
100s/50s 0/0 2/11 16/32 6/31
Top score 46 105 260* 126*
Balls bowled 558 331 12,144 3,754
Wickets 5 12 179 93
Bowling average 68.40 29.25 39.77 36.00
5 wickets in innings 0 0 3 0
10 wickets in match 0 n/a 1 n/a
Best bowling 2/71 3/5 6/66 4/15
Catches/stumpings 1/– 37/– 113/– 89/–
Source: Cricinfo, 06 December 2011
Cameron Leon White (born 18 August 1983) is an Australian cricketer and current Australian Twenty20 captain. A powerful middle order batsman and right-arm leg-spin bowler, White made his first-class cricket debut as a teenager in the 2000–01 season for the Victorian Bushrangers as a bowling all-rounder. Early comparisons with Victoria team-mate Shane Warne faded as White took on a role closer to that of Andrew Symonds, a batsman who bowled occasionally.
In 2003–04, he became Victoria's youngest ever captain at the age of 20 when he took over leadership of their one-day side, and the first-class captaincy followed the season after. International recognition came for the first time in 2005, but White found himself in and out of the side as the selectors and national captain Ricky Ponting looked for White to improve his bowling to play as a front-line spinner. Two successful winters with English county side Somerset helped to propel White back into the selectors' minds. After a couple of further unfruitful international spells, including four Test matches in 2008, White finally secured a regular place in the one-day squads after a string of good performances in 2009.

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Michael Hussey

Michael Hussey
Mike Hussey 3.jpg
Personal information
Full name Michael Edward Killeen Hussey
Born 27 May 1975 (age 36)
Mount Lawley, Western Australia, Australia
Nickname Mr. Cricket, Huss
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Batting style Left-handed
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Role Batsman
Relations DJ Hussey (brother)
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 393) 3 November 2005 v West Indies
Last Test 17 November 2011 v South African
ODI debut (cap 150) 1 February 2004 v India
Last ODI 28 October 2011 v South Africa
ODI shirt no. 48
Domestic team information
Years Team
1994 – Western Australia (squad no. 2)
2001–2003 Northamptonshire
2004 Gloucestershire
2005 Durham
2008–Present Chennai Super Kings (squad no. 48)
2011–Present Perth Scorchers
Career statistics
Competition Tests ODI FC LA
Matches 66 166 254 359
Runs scored 5,196 4,862 21,341 11,508
Batting average 50.44 51.17 52.30 45.30
100s/50s 15/26 3/35 57/97 12/86
Top score 195 109* 331* 123
Balls bowled 348 234 1,800 780
Wickets 6 2 25 20
Bowling average 27.16 113.50 36.23 41.05
5 wickets in innings 0 0 0 0
10 wickets in match 0 0 0 0
Best bowling 1/0 1/22 3/34 3/52
Catches/stumpings 63/– 92/– 274/– 187/–
Source: Cricinfo, 12 December 2011
Michael Edward Killeen Hussey (born 27 May 1975) is an Australian cricketer, a left-handed specialist batsman. Hussey is also widely known by his nickname Mr Cricket. Hussey was a relative latecomer to both the one-day international and Test Australian teams, debuting at 28 and 30 years of age in the respective formats, with 15,313 first-class runs before making his Test debut.[1] However, he has had a highly successful international career, being the top-ranked ODI batsman in the world in 2006.[2] He plays first-class cricket as vice-captain of the Western Warriors in Australia and has played for three counties in England. He also plays in the Indian Premier League for the Chennai Super Kings, although he opted out of the 2009 season. He was retained by Chennai Super Kings in the 2011–2012 season of Indian Premier League for $425,000 at auctions held in January 2011.

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Michael Clarke (cricketer)

Michael Clarke
Pm cricket shots09 5995.jpg
Personal information
Full name Michael John Clarke
Born 2 April 1981 (age 30)
Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
Nickname Pup, Clarkey
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Batting style Right-hand
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox
Role Batsman, Australian Captain
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 389) 6 October 2004 v India
Last Test 17 November 2011 v South Africa
ODI debut (cap 149) 19 January 2003 v England
Last ODI 28 October 2011 v South Africa
ODI shirt no. 23
Domestic team information
Years Team
2000– New South Wales
2004 Hampshire
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC List A
Matches 76 206 138 271
Runs scored 5,283 6,622 9,643 8,440
Batting average 46.34 45.35 45.06 42.84
100s/50s 18/21 6/49 33/37 7/63
Top score 168 130 201* 130
Balls bowled 1,794 2,314 2,974 3,010
Wickets 23 52 34 77
Bowling average 37.47 37.67 45.58 32.40
5 wickets in innings 1 1 1 1
10 wickets in match 0 0 0 0
Best bowling 6/9 5/35 6/9 5/35
Catches/stumpings 83/– 80/– 142/– 104/–
Source: Cricinfo, 12 December 2011
Michael John Clarke (born 2 April 1981) is a professional Australian cricketer and captain of the Australian cricket team for both test and ODI cricket. Nicknamed 'Pup', he is a right-handed middle-orderbatsman, and an occasional left-arm orthodox spin bowler. He represents New South Wales at a domestic level.
In January 2011, Clarke stood down as captain of the Australian Twenty20 cricket team to concentrate on his test and ODI performance.[1] He was succeeded by Cameron White.

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Ricky Ponting

Ricky Ponting
Ricky Ponting YM.jpg
Personal information
Full name Ricky Thomas Ponting
Born 19 December 1974 (age 37)
Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
Nickname Punter
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in)
Batting style Right-hand
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Right-arm off break
Role Batsman
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 366) 8 December 1995 v Sri Lanka
Last Test 17 November 2011 v South Africa
ODI debut (cap 123) 15 February 1995 v South Africa
Last ODI 28 October 2011 v South Africa
ODI shirt no. 14
T20I debut (cap 10) 17 February 2005 v New Zealand
Last T20I 8 June 2009 v Sri Lanka
T20I shirt no. 14
Domestic team information
Years Team
1992 – Tasmania
2004 Somerset
2008 Kolkata Knight Riders
2011 - Hobart Hurricanes
Career statistics
Competition Test ODIs FC List A
Matches 158 370 263 442
Runs scored 12,656 13,686 21,776 16,042
Batting average 52.29 42.63 54.98 42.21
100s/50s 39/58 30/82 73/97 34/97
Top score 257 164 257 164
Balls bowled 575 150 1,470 349
Wickets 5 3 14 8
Bowling average 54.60 34.66 57.07 33.62
5 wickets in innings 0 0 0 0
10 wickets in match 0 n/a 0 n/a
Best bowling 1/0 1/12 2/10 3/34
Catches/stumpings 187/– 157/– 280/– 189/–
Source: Cricinfo, 12 December 2011
Ricky Thomas Ponting (born 19 December 1974), nicknamed Punter, is an Australian cricketer, a former captain of the Australian cricket team between 2004 and 2011 in Test cricket and 2002 and 2011 in One Day International cricket. He is a specialist right-handed batsman, slips and close catching fielder, as well as a very occasional bowler. He is regarded as one of Australia's finest cricketers in the modern era. He represents the Tasmanian Tigers in Australian domestic cricket and played in the Indian Premier League with the Kolkata Knight Riders in 2008.
Ponting made his first-class debut for Tasmania in November 1992, when just 17 years and 337 days old, becoming the youngest Tasmanian to play in a Sheffield Shield match. However, he had to wait until 1995 before making his One Day International (ODI) debut, during a quadrangular tournament in New Zealand in a match against South Africa. His Test debut followed shortly after, when selected for the first Test of the 1995 home series against Sri Lanka in Perth, in which he scored 96. He lost his place in the national team several times in the period before early-1999, due to lack of form and discipline, before becoming One Day International captain in early-2002 and Test captain in early-2004.
After being involved in 156 Tests and 352 ODIs, Ponting is Australia's leading run-scorer in Test and ODI cricket, with more than 26,000 international runs as of November 2011. He has scored 39 Test centuries—behind only Indian Sachin Tendulkar (51), and South African Jacques Kallis (40)[1]—and second for most runs in ODIs behind Tendulkar.[2]
Ricky Ponting is the most successful captain of all time, with 48 victories in 77 Tests between 2004 and 31 December 2010, while as a player he is also the only cricketer in history to be involved in 100 Test victories.[3]

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Adam Gilchrist

Adam Gilchrist
074438-adam-gilchrist.jpg
Adam Gilchrist urged the nation to embrace role models of substance
Personal information
Full name Adam Craig Gilchrist
Born 14 November 1971 (age 40)
Bellingen, New South Wales, Australia
Nickname Gilly, Churchy
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Batting style Left Hand
Bowling style Right-arm off break
Role Wicket-keeper-batsman
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 381) 5 November 1999 v Pakistan
Last Test 24 January 2008 v India
ODI debut (cap 129) 25 October 1996 v South Africa
Last ODI 4 March 2008 v India
ODI shirt no. 18
Domestic team information
Years Team
1992–1994 New South Wales
1994–2008 Western Australia
2008–2010 Deccan Chargers
2010 – Middlesex
2011–present Kings XI Punjab
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC List A
Matches 96 287 190 355
Runs scored 5,570 9,619 10,334 11,288
Batting average 47.60 35.89 44.16 34.94
100s/50s 17/26 16/55 30/43 18/63
Top score 204* 172 204* 172
Balls bowled 12
Wickets 0
Bowling average
5 wickets in innings 0
10 wickets in match n/a
Best bowling 0/10
Catches/stumpings 379/37 417/55 756/55 526/65
Source: CricketArchive, 4 March 2008
Adam Craig Gilchrist AM[1] (born 14 November 1971), nicknamed "Gilly" or "Churchy",[2] is an Australian international cricketer who currently captains Kings XI Punjab and recently captained Middlesex.[3] He is an attacking left-handed batsman and record-breaking wicket-keeper, who redefined the role for the Australian national team through his aggressive batting. He is considered to be one of the greatest wicket-keeper-batsmen in the history of the game.[4] He holds the world record for the most dismissals by a wicket keeper in One Day International cricket and the most by an Australian in Test cricket.[5][6] His strike rate is amongst the highest in the history of both One-day and Test cricket; his century against England at Perth in December 2006 is the second fastest century in all Test cricket.[7] He is the only player to have hit 100 sixes in Test cricket.[8] His 17 Test and 16 ODI centuries are the most by a wicket-keeper.[9][10] He holds the unique record of scoring at least 50 runs in successive World Cup finals (in 1999, 2003 and 2007)[11] and is one of only three players to have won three titles.[12]
Gilchrist is renowned for walking when he considers himself to be out, sometimes contrary to the decision of the umpire.[13][14] He made his first-class debut in 1992, his first One-Day International appearance in 1996 in India and his Test debut in 1999.[3] During his career, he played for Australia in 96 Test matches and over 270 One-day internationals. He was Australia's vice-captain in both forms of the game, captaining the team when regular captains Steve Waugh and Ricky Ponting were unavailable.[15][16] He retired from international cricket in March 2008.

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Greg Chappell

Greg Chappell
Personal information
Full name Gregory Stephen Chappell
Born 7 August 1948 (age 63)
Unley, South Australia, Australia
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right arm medium
Role Batsman, coach, commentator
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 251) 11 December 1970 v England
Last Test 6 January 1984 v Pakistan
ODI debut (cap 1) 5 January 1971 v England
Last ODI 30 April 1983 v Sri Lanka
Domestic team information
Years Team
1973–1984 Queensland
1968–1969 Somerset
1966–1973 South Australia
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC LA
Matches 87 74 321 130
Runs scored 7110 2331 24535 3948
Batting average 53.86 40.18 52.20 36.89
100s/50s 24/31 3/14 74/111 4/27
Top score 247* 138* 247* 138*
Balls bowled 5327 3108 20926 5261
Wickets 47 72 291 130
Bowling average 40.70 29.12 29.95 25.93
5 wickets in innings 1 2 5 2
10 wickets in match 0 n/a 0 n/a
Best bowling 5/61 5/15 7/40 5/15
Catches/stumpings 122/– 23/– 376/– 54/1
Source: Cricinfo, 14 November 2007
Gregory Stephen Chappell MBE (born 7 August 1948 in Unley, South Australia) is a former cricketer who captained Australia between 1975 and 1977 and then joined the breakaway World Series Cricket (WSC) organisation, before returning to the Australian captaincy in 1979, a position he held until his retirement 1983.[1] The second of three brothers to play Test cricket, Chappell was the pre-eminent Australian batsman of his time who allied elegant stroke making to fierce concentration.[2] An exceptional all round player who bowled medium pace and, at his retirement, held the world record for the most catches in Test cricket,[3] Chappell's career straddled two eras as the game moved toward a greater level of professionalism after the WSC schism.[4]
Since his retirement as a player in 1984, Chappell has pursued various business and media interests as well as maintaining connections to professional cricket; he has been a selector for national and Queensland teams, a member of the Australian Cricket Board, and a coach. He was appointed coach of the India national cricket team on a 2 year contract in 2005. However, a series of controversies and personality clashes, combined with India's poor performance at the 2007 Cricket World Cup led to his resignation from the position on 4 April 2007.[5][6] Chappell has served as an academy coach for the Rajasthan Royals, and was hired as the All Stars Coach for the 2008 Twenty20 match against Australia.[7] He also serves as the executive coach for a series of Cricket Summer Camps in the United States as part of Chappell Way.[8]

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Ian Chappell

Ian Chappell
Chappelli2.jpg
Personal information
Full name Ian Michael Chappell
Born 26 September 1943 (age 68)
Unley, South Australia, Australia
Nickname Chappelli
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right arm leg spin
Role Top-order batsman
International information
National side Australia
Test debut (cap 231) 4 December 1964 v Pakistan
Last Test 6 February 1980 v England
ODI debut (cap 2) 5 January 1971 v England
Last ODI 14 January 1980 v England
Domestic team information
Years Team
1962–1980 South Australia
1963 Lancashire
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI FC LA
Matches 75 16 262 37
Runs scored 5345 673 19680 1277
Batting average 42.42 48.07 48.35 39.90
100s/50s 14/26 0/8 59/96 0/13
Top score 196 86 209 93*
Balls bowled 2873 42 13143 202
Wickets 20 2 176 5
Bowling average 65.80 11.50 37.57 28.40
5 wickets in innings 0 2 0
10 wickets in match 0 n/a 0 n/a
Best bowling 2/21 2/14 5/29 2/14
Catches/stumpings 105/– 5/– 312/1 20/–
Source: Cricinfo, 13 November 2007
Ian Michael Chappell (born 26 September 1943) is a former cricketer who played for South Australia and Australia. He captained Australia between 1971 and 1975 before taking a central role in the breakaway World Series Cricket organisation. Born into a cricketing family—his grandfather and brother also captained Australia—Chappell made a hesitant start to international cricket playing as a right-hand middle-order batsman and spin bowler. He found his niche when promoted to bat at number three. Known as “Chappelli”, he earned a reputation as one of the greatest captains the game has seen.[1][2][3][4] Chappell's blunt verbal manner led to a series of confrontations with opposition players and cricket administrators; the issue of sledging first arose during his tenure as captain and he was a driving force behind the professionalisation of Australian cricket in the 1970s.[5]
John Arlott called him, “a cricketer of effect rather than the graces”.[6] An animated presence at the batting crease, he constantly adjusted his equipment and clothing, and restlessly tapped his bat on the ground as the bowler ran in. Basing his game on a sound defence learned during many hours of childhood lessons, Chappell employed the drive and square cut to full effect.[5] He had an idiosyncratic method of playing back and across to a ball of full length and driving wide of mid on,[7] but his trademark shot was the hook, famously saying "three bouncers an over should be worth 12 runs to me".[8] A specialist slip fielder, he was the fourth player to take one hundred Test catches.
Since his retirement in 1980, he has pursued a high-profile career as a sports journalist and cricket commentator, predominately with Channel Nine.[4] He remains a major figure in Australian cricket: in 2006, Shane Warne called Chappell the biggest influence on his career. On 9 July 2009, Ian Chappell was inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.[10]

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